Women playing a game

*The Parent Zone*

Research tells us:

  1. The earlier in a child’s educational process parent involvement begins, the more powerful the effect.1
  2. The most effective forms of parent involvement are those which engage parents in working with their children on learning activities at home.2
  3. Family participation in education was twice as predictive of students’ academic success as family socioeconomic status.3
  4. The more parents are involved with their child’s learning, the more beneficial the achievement effect.4

Tips for Parents!

How to help:

  • Play vocabulary games in the car, at a restaurant, or waiting in line!  Try simple games with elementary age children, like “I Spy” or the “Memory Game.”  At home, play games like “Hot and Cold” or “Simon Says.”  With younger children, sing and play toy instruments.
  • Sit and go through magazines with your child, asking them to identify items, colors or shapes on the page!
  • Cook with your child!  This encourages math and vocabulary, not to mention, a good time!
  • Paint, color or use clay with your child.
  • Play learning games with your child.  Spelling, math and vocabulary games are fun and can really make a difference in your child’s success at school.
  • Most importantly, read to your children of all ages!  If you don’t own a lot of books, take your child to the library and sit and read there. 

National Standards for Parent/Family Involvement Programs5

Standard 1: Communicating – Communication between the school and home is regular, two-way and meaningful.
Standard 2: Parenting - Parenting skills are promoted and supported.
Standard 3: Student Learning – Parents play an integral role in assisting student learning.
Standard 4: Volunteering – Parents are welcome in the school, and their support and assistance are sought.
Standard 5: School Decision Making and Advocacy – Parents are full partners in the decisions that affect children and families.
Standard 6: Collaborating with Community – Community resources are used to strengthen schools, families, and student learning.

 

  1. Cotton, K, Wikeland, K., Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory, School Improvement Series.
  2. Cotton, K, Wikeland, K., Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory, School Improvement Series.
  3. Walberg (1984) in his review of 29 school-parent programs.
  4. Cotton, K, Wikeland, K., Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory, School Improvement Series.
  5. National Parent Teacher Association